Blog dedicated to the continuous education in Gynecology and Endocrinology

 

ENDOCRINE CONTROL OF BONE METABOLISM

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Acquisition of bone mass during childhood and adolescence. Physiological and clinical aspects
Saggese Giuseppe

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Clinical relevance and molecular mechanism of androgen/androgen receptor actions on bone growth
Huang Ko-En

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The evolution of the use of markers of bone resorption and formation in clinical practice
Christiansen Claus

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Osteopenia, osteoporosis, fracture: when and how should we initiate treatment?
Yoles Israel

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POST-MENARCHAL DISORDERS AND REPRODUCTIVE TRACT ANOMALIES

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Post menarchal menorrhagiaDeligeoroglou Efthimios

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Hormonal contraception in adolescence
Creatsas George

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Weight loss-associated amenorrheaBruni Vincenzina

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Therapies for acne and androgen excesses
Paoletti Anna Maria

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Surgical strategies for the correction of vaginal agenesis
Jasonni Valerio

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Evaluation of melatonin on the precocious puberty: a pilot study.

DGYE-2010-0141.R1 [501888] 5 pag

Soares-Jr, José; de Holanda, Felisbela; Vieira, Lucia; Tufik, Sérgio; BIGNOTTO, Magda; Maganhin, Carla; Baracat, Edmund

Abstract: Objective: to evaluate the effect of 6 – sulphatoxymelatonin on the sleep quality of girls with precocious puberty. Study design: Ninety-nine girls were divided into three groups: GI – precocious puberty; GII – normal prepubescent; GIII – normal puberty. Questionnaires containing demographic and clinical data were applied. Blood was collected for hormonal evaluation for 6-sulphatoxymelatonin. The modified Rush Sleep Diary was employed. Results: The levels of 6-sulphatoxymelatonin were highest in the group without pubertal development (75.23 ± 10.84 ng/mL), second highest in the group with normal puberty (45.66 ± 3.87 ng / mL, p < 0.001) and lowest in the group with true precocious puberty (37.04 ± 5.47 ng / mL). The amount of day sleep was greater in the group without pubertal development compared to other groups. Conclusion: Despite the sleep data, melatonin may be involved in the precocious puberty process.

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Adult height, body mass index and time of menarche of girls with idiopathic central precocious puberty after gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog treatment

DGYE-2010-0139.R1[507289] 5 pag

Mahachoklertwattana, Pat; Poomthavorn, Preamrudee; Suphasit, Ratchadaporn

Abstract: Background: Long-term outcome data of central precocious puberty (CPP) girls treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog (GnRHa) are conflicting.
Aim: To assess long-term outcome of girls with idiopathic CPP (iCPP) treated with GnRHa
Methods: We compared adult height (AH), body mass index (BMI) and time of menarche in GnRHa-treated (n = 47) and untreated (n = 11) girls with iCPP.
Results: There were no differences in age, bone age, height, weight and BMI z-scores, predicted adult height (PAH) at the time of diagnosis and target height between the 2 groups. Mean (SD) age of GnRHa-treated girls was 8.5 (1.0) years at the start of treatment. Mean (SD) AH of the treated group was greater [158.6 (5.2) vs. 154.8 (5.6) cm], p <0.05. AH gain over pre-treatment PAH in the treated group was 4.7 cm. BMI z-score of treated girls was 1.26 (0.95) before the treatment initiated and returned to normal [0.16 (1.0)] at the time of AH reached. Menstruation occurred at 0.9 (0.5) years following GnRHa discontinuation with regular pattern.
Conclusions: Long-term GnRHa therapy has a modest beneficial effect on adult height gain in girls with iCPP. No detrimental effects on increasing BMI and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis reactivation are demonstrated.

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Interview with G Creatsas

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Sexual transmitted diseases
G Creatsas

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