Blog dedicated to the continuous education in Gynecology and Endocrinology

 

SERMs

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Target organs for new SERMs
Palacios Santiago

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SERMs and bone health
De Villiers Tobie

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Raloxifene action on the endothelium
Cano Antonio

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SERMs effects on the endometrium
Goldstein Steven

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PhytoSERMS – maintaining benefits, minimising risks
Panay Nicholas

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Estetrol; a fetal estrogen for clinical use

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Estetrol; a fetal estrogen for clinical use
Genazzani Andrea R

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Estrogen promotes B cell activation in vitro through down-regulating CD80 molecule expression

DGYE-2010-0008.R1[507281]

Li, Li (contact); Fu, Yibing; Liu, Xiaowen; Ma, Chunyan; Zhang, Jie; Jiao, Yulian; You, Li; Chen, Zi-jiang; Zhao, Yueran

Abstract: Estrogen is the main female hormone of women. It has diverse effects on cell growth, differentiation and homeostatic functions. Accumulated evidence has indicated that estrogen may regulate multiple immune functions and the immune status of women. However, there is little report on the effect of estrogen on mature B cell functions. In this study, we observed the effect of 17β-estradiol (E2) on the proliferation, apoptosis, antibody production and differentiation of splenic B cells of mice in vitro. Splenocytes of female BALB/c mice were isolated and cultured with E2. E2 treatments decreased the expression of CD80 molecule on splenic B cells but enhanced the total IgG antibody production of splenocyte, without promoting the differentiation of B cells to plasma cells. E2 protected splenic B cells from the serum-deficiency-induced apoptosis but had no influence on the proliferation of B cells. These results suggest that estrogen may promote the activity of B cells through down-regulating the expression of CD80 molecule on B cells.

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Estrogen receptor (ER) is a major ..

DGYE-2010-0131.R1[507286]

Wincewicz, Andrzej; Baltaziak, Marek; Kanczuga-Koda, Luiza; Koda, Mariusz; Sulkowska, Urszula; Famulski, Waldemar

Abstract: Estrogen receptor (ER) is a major feature of endometrioid adenocarcinoma with significant impact on constitution of estrogen-responsiveness of this endometrial malignancy, in which STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription) becomes hyperactivated. The aim of our study was to detect immunohistochemically and compare expressions of STAT3 with apoptosis regulators as Bak and Bcl-xL in regard to different pathological features and variably pronounced ER-alpha immunoprofile in 78 endometrioid adenocarcinomas. STAT3 was abundantly detected in nuclei of cancer cells in 54 cases thus pointing at its activation as an universal nuclear transcriptional factor. Bcl-xL and Bak were expressed in cytoplasm of malignant cells in 62 and 20 cancers respectively. STAT3 correlated both with Bcl-xL (p=0.001, r=0.365) and Bak (p<0.001, r=0.436) in all of endometrioid adenocarcinomas and variably in different subgroups of these tumors segregated in regard to grading, staging and patients’ age. Remarkably, only ER-alpha positive cancers retained these correlations in opposition to ER-alpha negative tumors with negativity defined as an immunoreactivity below 10%. CONCLUSIONS: ER-alpha receptor probably enhances interactions between STAT3 and Bcl-xL to be present in statistically significant manner. Presence of ER-alpha receptor seems to be crucial for relationships among Bcl-xL and STAT3 to occur in endometrioid adenocarcinomas.

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Electron Emission and Product Analysis of Estrone. Progesterone interactions studied by experiments in vitro.

DGYE-2010-0115.R1 [495435] 8 pag

Getoff, Nikola (contact); Gerschpacher, Marion; Hartmann, Johannes; Schittl, Heike; Danielova, Iren; Ying, Shaobin; Huber, J; Quint, Ruth

Abstract: Recent studies showed that hormones like progesterone, testosterone, etc. can eject e-aq (solvated electrons). By means of electron transfer processes via the brain, the hormones communicate with other biological systems in the organism. more

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