Blog dedicated to the continuous education in Gynecology and Endocrinology

 

HORMONES AND FEMALE BRAIN AGEING

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Effects of hormone therapy and botanical menopausal therapies on cognition in midlife women
Maki Pauline

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Hormones and female brain aging
Henderson Victor

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Gonadal steroid effects on brain neurosteroids and B-Endorphin
Pluchino Nicola

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Depression and menopause: why antidepressant are not enough
Graziottin Alessandra

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PLENARY SESSION – FEMALE SEXUALITY

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Brain control of female sexuality: neuroendocrine control
Nappi Rossella

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Sexual dysfunction after menopause: the place of androgen substitution
Birkhaeuser Martin

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Assisted procreation and its impact on couple sexuality

Valentino Valeria

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How to promote the sexual health of the elderly couple Bitzer Johannes

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Catamenial Epilepsy: Hormonal aspects

Verrotti, Alberto; Laus, Melissa; Coppola, Giangennaro; parisi, Pasquale; Mohn, Angelika; Chiarelli, Francesco – DGYE-2009-0282[490606]

The term catamenial epilepsy is used to describe the cyclical occurrence of seizure exacerbations during particular phases of menstrual cycle in women with preexisting epilepsy. Recent investigations have demonstrated the existence of at least three patterns of catamenial seizure exacerbation: perimenstrual and periovulatory in ovulatory cycle and entire luteal phase in anovulatory cycle. Cyclical changes in the circulationg levels of estrogens (proconvulsant) and progesterone (anticonvulsant) play a central role in the development of catamenial epilepsy. Also variations in concentrations of antiepileptic drugs across the menstrual cycle may contribute to increased seizure susceptibility. A variety of approaches have been proposed for the treatment of catamenial epilepsy.

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Are estrogens neuroprotective?

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Henderson

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Victor Maki Pauline

Are estrogens neuroprotective?

Henderson- Victor Maki Pauline

(14th World Congress of Gynecological Endocrinology – March 4-7 2010)

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• November, 2009 •

Post hoc MRI’s cannot justify the conclusions of WHIMS

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Frederick Naftolin, MD PhD, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY
Jennifer King, BS University of Miami School of Medicine, MIAMI,
and John H. Morrison, PhD Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY.

The Women’s Health Initiative Memory Study (WHIMS) and WHIMS-MRI trials address the clinical effects of MHT begun in largely asymptomatic postmenopausal women at ages 65 and older (1-3). Contrary to to meta-analysis of observational studies on peri-menopausal women given MHT,4 both WHIMS reports indicate that estrogen and progestin have no preventive role in mild cognitive impairment and may in fact increase risk for dementia (1-3). It is not stressed that the WHIMS population was older and had many characteristics that would discourage MHT. more

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